PublicationDetail

Chair for Computer Aided Medical Procedures & Augmented Reality
Lehrstuhl für Informatikanwendungen in der Medizin & Augmented Reality

C. Graumann, B. Fuerst, C. Hennersperger, F. Bork, N. Navab
Robotic Ultrasound Trajectory Planning for Volume of Interest Coverage
In Proceedings ICRA 2016: IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation (bib)

Medical robotic ultrasound offers potential to assist interventions, ease long-term monitoring and reduce operator dependency. Various techniques for remote control of ultrasound probes through telemanipulation systems have been presented in the past, however not exploiting the potential of fully autonomous acquisitions directly performed by robotic systems. In this paper, a trajectory planning algorithm for automatic robotic ultrasound acquisition under expert supervision is introduced. The objective is to compute a suitable path for covering a volume of interest selected in diagnostic images, for example by prior segmentation. A 3D patient surface point cloud is acquired using a depth camera, which is the sole prerequisite besides the volume delineation. An easily parameterizable path function generates single or multiple parallel scan trajectories capable of dealing with large target volumes. A spline is generated through the preliminary path points and is transferred to a lightweight robot to perform the ultrasound scan using an impedance control mode. The proposed approach is validated via simulation as well as on phantoms and on animal viscera.
This material is presented to ensure timely dissemination of scholarly and technical work. Copyright and all rights therein are retained by authors or by other copyright holders. All persons copying this information are expected to adhere to the terms and constraints invoked by each authors copyright. In most cases, these works may not be reposted without the explicit permission of the copyright holder.



Edit | Attach | Refresh | Diffs | More | Revision r1.11 - 19 Jul 2016 - 16:26 - NassirNavab

Lehrstuhl für Computer Aided Medical Procedures & Augmented Reality    rss.gif